Miramont Open Championship Highlights

Here’s the highlights from Miramont Open Championship: Girls’ 18 Singles: -Maleeha – Semifinalist.

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Tournament Wrap Wednesday!

Every Wednesday, we share the match highlights of our Students competing in different Tournaments.

I didn’t just wake up one day thinking, Wow, I want to be a tennis player,It all came gradually

Karen reached out to HAT, hoping for an opportunity to train and travel on the WTA circuit with the expert coaching team.  You see Karen does not come from a family of professional athletes or parents who are well to do.  They are an every day family, with an extraordinary daughter; fighting her way to the top of the game, often facing what seem to be insurmountable obstacles.

Karen Barritza, WTA Player from Denmark

Traveling the world every week playing tournaments in not so glamorous locations, often alone, with enormous pressures from home and from self, can be overwhelming.  Breaking through as a professional tennis player is extremely difficult.  It certainly demands skill, talent and dedication; however, it also requires a tremendous amount of emotional and financial support.

Becoming a top-ranked tennis player does not happen automatically.  “I didn’t just wake up one day thinking, ‘Wow, I want to be a tennis player!’ says Karen, “It all came gradually.  I started playing when I was six on a vacation in Romania, and got really into it and practiced a lot. When I came home (to Denmark), I was playing quite well, started winning a lot and kept practicing – people and coaches started noticing me.

Karen credits her involvement with HAT for much of her success both on and off the court.  “Those involved with HAT are ambitious and talented.  The organization provides a nurturing environment so that you can take your tennis to the next level.  I have learned a lot and have had a lot of experiences that I feel I can take with me ‘till later in life.”  Karen’s goal is to be in the Top 100 WTA singles and to play Grand Slam events.

Today #StaffSpotlight: Brent Mazza, Director of Tennis , HAT

Brent Mazza, Director of Tennis, HAT
Brent Mazza, Director of Tennis, HAT

Brent, a California native, has been a student of the HAT methodology for nearly a decade and was HAT’s very first intern and has since earned his way to become HAT’s Director of Tennis. Brent previously worked for the International Tennis Hall of Fame, the Boston Lobsters World Team Tennis Franchise, and the Champions Tour.  He is a graduate of Boston University with a Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. Brent has a tremendous passion to provide every one of his students life lessons through powerful teaching in tennis fundamentals, tactics and match strategies that will last a lifetime.

EXPERIENCE SUMMARY

17 Years of high level sports experience
14 Years of tennis experience
8 Years of coaching experience
Selected as USTA Intermountain Zone Team Coach (2014)
HAT Teaching Method Certified
USPTA Certified
PTR Certified
Brent has coached/Consulted with numerous ITF & professional players including:

– Karen Barbat (Denmark – *WTA #474)
– Zoe Scandalis (USA – *WTA #711)
– Ao Gia (China – #497 ITF)
– Hao Zhang (China – *ITF #613)
– Pengyu Zhang (China – *ITF #614)

Remembering Julian Bond

Julian Bond is a civil rights leader who had to go to the Supreme Court to be allowed to take his seat in the Georgia House of Representatives.
Julian Bond was born on January 14, 1940, in Nashville, Tennessee. He became a civil rights activist while in college. In 1965, he was elected to Georgia’s state legislature, but his opposition to the war in Vietnam meant that it would take a U.S. Supreme Court ruling for him to be allowed to take his seat. Bond later served as the head of the Southern Poverty Law Center and of the NAACP. Bond died on August 15, 2015 at the age of 75.

Early LifeHorace Julian Bond, generally known as Julian Bond, was born in Nashville, Tennessee, on January 14, 1940. His family moved to Pennsylvania five years later, where his father served as the first African-American president of Lincoln University. In 1957, Bond enrolled at Atlanta’s Morehouse College, where he helped found The Pegasus, a literary magazine, and interned atTIME magazine.

Student Activism

While still a student, Bond became a founding member of the Committee on Appeal for Human Rights. He led nonviolent student protests against segregation in Atlanta parks, restaurants and movie theaters. In Raleigh, North Carolina, Bond helped form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in 1960. The next year, he left Morehouse to serve as the SNCC’s communications director, a position he held for five years. He returned to Morehouse a decade later and received a degree in English.

Life in Politics

In 1965, Bond was voted into the Georgia House of Representatives. However, the state congressional body refused to swear him into his seat because he had endorsed a SNCC statement that decried the war in Vietnam. Martin Luther King Jr. organized a protest rally on Bond’s behalf. In 1966, the case went to the U.S. Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled in Bond’s favor on the basis of freedom of speech.

Bond was finally able to take his seat in the Georgia House of Representatives in 1967. He served in the Georgia House until 1975, and went on to serve in the Georgia Senate from 1975 to 1986. During his tenure in the state legislature, Bond wrote over 60 bills that were ratified as law.

Bond attended the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, where he was nominated as a vice-presidential candidate. He was the first African American to receive the honor, but withdrew his name because he was not old enough to hold the office according to constitutional guidelines.

In 1986, Bond entered a Democratic primary to run for the U.S. House of Representatives in Georgia. He lost the heavily contested race to John Lewis, another civil rights leader and former SNCC member.

Continuing Activism

From 1971 to 1979, Bond served as president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, an organization he also co-founded. He was president of Atlanta’s chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People before becoming the chairman of the national NAACP, a position he held from 1998 until 2010. He is now chairman emeritus of the NAACP and president emeritus of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Bond continued to be a prominent voice in the media. He was a commentator for NBC’s Today show, wrote a national newspaper column and produced poems that have appeared publications such as the Nationand the New York Times. He was also a professor of history at the University of Virginia and an adjunct professor at American University.

Death and Legacy

Julian Bond died on August 15, 2015, after a brief illness. He was 75 years old. In a statement, Southern Poverty Law Center co-founder Morris Dees said, “With Julian’s passing, the country has lost one of its most passionate and eloquent voices for the cause of justice. He advocated not just for African Americans, but for every group, indeed every person subject to oppression and discrimination, because he recognized the common humanity in us all.”

SourceBiogrpahy.com

“Don’t believe everything you think.”

Every Monday, our Mental Skills Specialist share the best quote to mark #MondayMentalTip .

Today he shared “Don’t believe everything you think.” – Ed Tseng, HAT Mental Skill Specialist.

Follow us in case you would like to make your self mentally strong before the week starts on every Monday.

“At home in Peru, he rises before school to practise tennis”

Marcos with TrophyAt home in Peru, he rises before school to practice tennis or work out.  After school Marcos plays tennis for two hours followed by an hour of fitness training.  Then it’s dinner, homework, sleep and the whole process starts over again.  His schedule is very demanding, but Marcos will tell you that he wouldn’t have it any other way.

This is only a part of Marcos’ story.  Traveling to-and-from school and the courts is on foot or by taxi.  “In Peru, some of the streets have trash spread out on the road and you have to know where you are because there are dangerous parts and there is a lot of traffic.  Here, (in the U.S.) everything is really far away so you must have a car so you can manage yourself, (but) everything is so clean.  There is no pollution and everywhere is really safe so you don’t have to worry about your security.”

Having the desire to excel at tennis and realizing that expert training in a safe environment was not possible for him, Marcos reached out to High Altitude Tennis Academy Director, Ryan Segelke.

His first visit in 2013 was for a brief two weeks. “It was such an awesome, life-changing experience”, remembers Marcos.  HAT was then able to obtain funding enabling Marcos to return to the U.S. over his school break in 2014.

The results were not anything less than incredible – for Marcos, for his family, for the coaches and entire HAT Community.  “The first time I played in an indoor tournament, I could feel the rush of adrenaline.”  Training at HAT is hard work, but Marcos is learned so much both on and off the court.  “I love this sport and I never get tired of it.  It teaches me a lot of things, especially to never give up and to fight for your goals not matter what happens because there is always a solution.”

Marcos has set his sights high – wanting to play tennis professionally.  However, he is also quite practical, “My life plan is to try to get a full scholarship to one of the best universities [Division I] so that I can improve my game.  When I finish university I am going to try to play on the professional tennis tour, knowing that when I finish my studies, and if something unexpected happens, I can still work.”

Block your Date

Don’t forget to block your date on 10th October 2015 for The HAT FUND 1st Annual Charity Event in Denver, Colorado.

PASSTHEHAT
The 1st ever HAT Annual Charity Event in Denver, Colorado.

The HAT FUND cordially invites you and your friends to an entertaining, informative, thought-provoking evening featuring nationally syndicated, award winning artist, Keith Knight who will be presenting his not to be missed slideshow, They Shoot Black People, Don’t They: A Cartoonists Look at Police Brutality.

Knight’s combination of sharp, witty cartoons and emotional storytelling will make you laugh, cry, wince, think and (hopefully) act to make this world a more positive place.

And don’t miss a performance by local musicians LeAnn Ferrell and Travis Paul.

HAT Fund this week Tournaments Results, Week Review

USTA Intermountain Level 4 Summer Masters

Girls’ 14 Singles: -Sammy – Beat the #3 seed en route to the quarterfinals.

Girls’ 14 Doubles: -Sammy and Hana – Finalists while beating the #1 and #3 seeds along the way.

South Suburban Junior Challenger #3

Boys’ 12 Singles: -Chase – Champion.

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