Remembering Julian Bond

Julian Bond is a civil rights leader who had to go to the Supreme Court to be allowed to take his seat in the Georgia House of Representatives.
Julian Bond was born on January 14, 1940, in Nashville, Tennessee. He became a civil rights activist while in college. In 1965, he was elected to Georgia’s state legislature, but his opposition to the war in Vietnam meant that it would take a U.S. Supreme Court ruling for him to be allowed to take his seat. Bond later served as the head of the Southern Poverty Law Center and of the NAACP. Bond died on August 15, 2015 at the age of 75.

Early LifeHorace Julian Bond, generally known as Julian Bond, was born in Nashville, Tennessee, on January 14, 1940. His family moved to Pennsylvania five years later, where his father served as the first African-American president of Lincoln University. In 1957, Bond enrolled at Atlanta’s Morehouse College, where he helped found The Pegasus, a literary magazine, and interned atTIME magazine.

Student Activism

While still a student, Bond became a founding member of the Committee on Appeal for Human Rights. He led nonviolent student protests against segregation in Atlanta parks, restaurants and movie theaters. In Raleigh, North Carolina, Bond helped form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in 1960. The next year, he left Morehouse to serve as the SNCC’s communications director, a position he held for five years. He returned to Morehouse a decade later and received a degree in English.

Life in Politics

In 1965, Bond was voted into the Georgia House of Representatives. However, the state congressional body refused to swear him into his seat because he had endorsed a SNCC statement that decried the war in Vietnam. Martin Luther King Jr. organized a protest rally on Bond’s behalf. In 1966, the case went to the U.S. Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled in Bond’s favor on the basis of freedom of speech.

Bond was finally able to take his seat in the Georgia House of Representatives in 1967. He served in the Georgia House until 1975, and went on to serve in the Georgia Senate from 1975 to 1986. During his tenure in the state legislature, Bond wrote over 60 bills that were ratified as law.

Bond attended the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, where he was nominated as a vice-presidential candidate. He was the first African American to receive the honor, but withdrew his name because he was not old enough to hold the office according to constitutional guidelines.

In 1986, Bond entered a Democratic primary to run for the U.S. House of Representatives in Georgia. He lost the heavily contested race to John Lewis, another civil rights leader and former SNCC member.

Continuing Activism

From 1971 to 1979, Bond served as president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, an organization he also co-founded. He was president of Atlanta’s chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People before becoming the chairman of the national NAACP, a position he held from 1998 until 2010. He is now chairman emeritus of the NAACP and president emeritus of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Bond continued to be a prominent voice in the media. He was a commentator for NBC’s Today show, wrote a national newspaper column and produced poems that have appeared publications such as the Nationand the New York Times. He was also a professor of history at the University of Virginia and an adjunct professor at American University.

Death and Legacy

Julian Bond died on August 15, 2015, after a brief illness. He was 75 years old. In a statement, Southern Poverty Law Center co-founder Morris Dees said, “With Julian’s passing, the country has lost one of its most passionate and eloquent voices for the cause of justice. He advocated not just for African Americans, but for every group, indeed every person subject to oppression and discrimination, because he recognized the common humanity in us all.”

SourceBiogrpahy.com

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The HAT Academy Hosted its Tennis Year-End Event in Denver, Colorado

May 31st , 2015 – Denver, Colorado, USA – 

Each year the HAT Academy present students with awards for academic achievement named for a “trailblazer” in the field of education.  Last year we were honored to have our own advisory council member Marilyn M Gordanier founder of Laurel Springs School and this year were extremely proud to be presenting the Rachel Davis Academic Achievement Award to scholar athletes who have completed the year with a GPA of 3.75 and above.

 Award Recipients:

James Chrisman,

Samantha Moore -Thomson,

Ryan Lahr,

Sauray Behara,

Ryan Neale,

Andrew Seehausen,

Megan Lantz

Dr Rachel Davis, PHD
Dr Rachel Davis, PHD

What a moving speech Dr. Davis shared with us. The HF Community is thrilled to have such a passionate, thoughtful person leading us as the Chair of the HAT FUND Board.

The second student honor, The DaVarryl J Williamson Leadership Award was presented to Trace Collins.  Throughout the years Trace has shown the proclivity to serve as a role model with energy, enthusiasm and perseverance.  He has courageously overcome daunting neurological issues.  The courage shown by this young man is inspired.  Mr. DaVarryl Williamson in fact inspired us all with his talk about overcoming obstacles, choosing your path, and focusing on what the future has to offer if we are willing to put in the effort and accept help from others rather than falling prey to the hardships of the past.

DaVarryl J Williamson with Trance Collins
DaVarryl J Williamson and  Trace Collins (with his Leadership Award).

Other Speakers included Mr. and Mrs. Collins, parents of HAT graduate and award recipient Trace Collins, Michael Farrington, HAT Site Director and Lead Fitness Instructor along with Ryan Segelke, Founder of High Altitude Tennis.

Rachel Davis, PHD distributing awards among our young athlete for their performances
Rachel Davis, PHD distributing awards among our young athlete for their performances

“I want to say thank you to the HAT Community for coming out to support this event as well as supporting the HAT programs each year.   Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the HAT FUND… there are many… and a very special thank you to Ryan Segelke and the extremely dedicated and loyal HAT staff.  I am extremely proud to be a part of such a hardworking, devoted team.”

“I look forward to seeing everyone at the next HF Event.” – Leslie Segelke, Co-Founder | Director of The HAT Fund

June 24th  HF Enrichment Event: Unique Lives and Experiences/Malala Yousafzai is being held at the Bellco Theatre, Denver.  We will send detailed information soon.

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